LCWR

Leadership Conference of Women Religious

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Publications

LCWR offers its members a wide variety of publications designed to keep them informed of current information and events regarding the conference and religious life. These publications are available to the public as well.

For information on ordering LCWR publications, contact Carol Glidden at cglidden@lcwr.org.

Climate Change and Hunger (Jan. 2009, Vol. 18, No. 1)

For I was hungry…” Many speak of hunger. Who are the hungry? Around the world desperate cries of hunger resound. “With higher food prices now, we eat only once a day.” “We had hoped the rains would improve, but the animals died and food is scarce.” “Often it is leaves, shrubs, and mud cakes for the children.” 

Update (January 2009)

This month marks a major change for those of us who live here in the United States. We have the completion of the term of one President and the inauguration of another. For about two years we have been immersed in the prenomination, nomination, convention, and election process for this new national administration.

Update (December 2008)

The Sufi mystic and musician, Hazat Inayat Khan, wrote:

A person who, alone, has seen something beautiful, who has heard something harmonious, who has tasted something delicious, who has smelled something fragrant, may have enjoyed it, but not completely. The complete joy is in sharing one’s joy with others.

Update (November 2008)

While attending a meetingin Pennsylvania, I hadan opportunity to visitGettysburg, a site of a CivilWar that scarred our country and lefthundreds of thousands of soldiers dead,wounded, or missing. There on thebattlefield I grieved the loss of so manylives in a conflict that tore a union apart.Standing on the ground where AbrahamLincoln addressed a splintered nation,I glimpsed something of the impact ofa courageous president’s efforts to healdivisions, end the Civil War, free those enslaved, andredirect the attention of individual states toward thegood of the whole.

Clean Energy — A Tricky Business with Possibilities (Oct. 2008, Vol. 17, No. 3)

Is your response denial, despair or hope when you pay $4 a gallon for gas, see food costs continue to rise, and daily hear of the uncertain, fl uctuating economy? In the United States all are tied to increased energy needs that historically have been dependent on cheap, readily available fossil fuels.  Transportation uses 37% of our energy while production of electricity requires 40% more to sustain our lifestyle.  We are, in fact, only one-fi fth of the world’s human population but use 23% of the global energy diet (World Population Organization).

Update (October 2008)

Over the course of this summer many of us, as individuals or as congregations and organizations, have been through some major transitions. LCWR, too, has had major changes and this summer’s assembly process has set the stage for more.

Annual Report 2007-08 - The Next Frontier: Religious Life at the Edge of Tomorrow

The theme of this annual report, The Next Frontier: Religious Life at the Edge of Tomorrow, engenders a certain optimism and hope among us, the presidency of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious. There is something about being on the frontier that stirs imagination, shakes one out of “settling in,” and encourages one to shed what is no longer needed. 

What a gift it is to witness the commitment and courage of so many pioneers like you, the leaders who live on the edge of something new!

Update (August/September 2008)

Almost three years ago I was “elected into” one of the most remarkable experiences of my life—the Presidency of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious. From my perspective, the only appropriate theme for my last letter is “thank you."

Cherish Earth’s Wetlands (Jul 2008, Vol. 17, No. 3)

Katrina. The word makes me shudder, makes my heart race in fear and rage. I don’t remember a lot about the hurricane that day … just fear, confusion, and hopelessness. After reaching safety through the love and compassion of so many friends and strangers, rage began to consume me as I learned of the horrendous toll on human lives and God’s creation, some of which could have been prevented. There are many questions we hadn’t seriously considered before then. I hope we do now. 

Update (July 2008)

In the October 2006 issue of LCWR Update, Carole Shinnick wrote an article entitled “Did You Ever Thank the Angels In Your Life?” As I write this column, I am aware of an “angel” who will transition out of her position as executive director of LCWR after our August assembly. Carole has given a total of nine years to LCWR, six years as executive director and the prior three years as secretary of LCWR. As you read my reflection, I invite you to pause to appreciate this “angel” in our lives.

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