LCWR

Leadership Conference of Women Religious

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Publications

LCWR offers its members a wide variety of publications designed to keep them informed of current information and events regarding the conference and religious life. These publications are available to the public as well.

For information on ordering LCWR publications, contact Carol Glidden at cglidden@lcwr.org.

Update (August/September 2008)

Almost three years ago I was “elected into” one of the most remarkable experiences of my life—the Presidency of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious. From my perspective, the only appropriate theme for my last letter is “thank you."

Cherish Earth’s Wetlands (Jul 2008, Vol. 17, No. 3)

Katrina. The word makes me shudder, makes my heart race in fear and rage. I don’t remember a lot about the hurricane that day … just fear, confusion, and hopelessness. After reaching safety through the love and compassion of so many friends and strangers, rage began to consume me as I learned of the horrendous toll on human lives and God’s creation, some of which could have been prevented. There are many questions we hadn’t seriously considered before then. I hope we do now. 

Update (July 2008)

In the October 2006 issue of LCWR Update, Carole Shinnick wrote an article entitled “Did You Ever Thank the Angels In Your Life?” As I write this column, I am aware of an “angel” who will transition out of her position as executive director of LCWR after our August assembly. Carole has given a total of nine years to LCWR, six years as executive director and the prior three years as secretary of LCWR. As you read my reflection, I invite you to pause to appreciate this “angel” in our lives.

Update (June 2008)

In the May issue of Update you found coverage of the LCWR officers’ meetings with Vatican officials in Rome. The written word gave an excellent overview of the sessions. The colorful photos included some of the women and men with whom we met and also shared informal time together.

Update (May 2008)

In early April the LCWR presidency and executive director, along with the executive committee of CMSM, traveled to Rome for our annual visit to the Vatican offices. Perhaps because this was my last visit, I was more conscious of the Scripture readings as our small “community of believers” gathered to celebrate Eucharist each day. Over the course of the week, we prayed over and listened to vivid stories of post-Resurrection encounters and the struggles of an emerging church.

US Impact on Global Economic Justice Through the Lens of Catholic Social Teaching (Apr. 2008, Vol. 17, No. 2)

The presidential election campaigns are focused mainly on domestic issues such as the state of the economy, the housing crisis, and healthcare reform.  Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and global climate change are on the public radar screen, but unfortunately, few of the many other key global economic justice issues are.  

Update (April 2008)

This is an exciting time for my community as we partner with a developer to renovate our motherhouse and to develop our land into the Village of St. Mary’s. Having explored a variety of alternatives for our future, historic designation of our buildings and senior housing tax credits will enable us to remain on our property and open up our space to others. We are well on the way to creating a master plan for the use of our land.

Update (March 2008)

Easter is early this year. We have heard it said many times that the Christmas tree was just taken to the back porch and we were in procession to receive ashes on our foreheads.

Update (February 2008)

I am writing this reflection in the afterglow of holidays and New Year’s resolutions. From talk shows to ordinary conversations, everyone seems caught up in the desire to lose weight, become fit, and make healthy life choices. For us as religious, especially those in leadership, the “resolution of choice” often has more to do with slowing down and getting off the treadmill of activity and busyness. Easier said...

2008 Elections: From ‘YOYO’ to ‘WITT’ Economics (Jan. 2008, Vol 17, No. 1)

Domestic economic justice is essentially a vision and a mission for all people of good will who are concerned for the common good. Our experience reflects the reality that there is widespread economic insecurity in the United States.

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