LCWR

Leadership Conference of Women Religious

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Publications

LCWR offers its members a wide variety of publications designed to keep them informed of current information and events regarding the conference and religious life. These publications are available to the public as well.

For information on ordering LCWR publications, contact Carol Glidden at cglidden@lcwr.org.

Update (April 2006)

I have two images competing in my mind when someone mentions the word “globalization.”  The one is the Tower of Babel--the confusion and invisible walls of misunderstanding that scatter a once homogenous people. The center that held this people in community was imploded and language became the metaphor for separation and alienation. They could no longer understand what a person was saying. So they became “other,” called stranger, seen as a threat and gradually named “enemy.” Violence and war made their entry into human history.

Update (March 2006)

Even with our best efforts, it is virtually impossible for women religious in leadership not to be concerned with diminishment—aging members and decreasing numbers.

In December and early January I experienced the deaths of three women religious in the Philadelphia area. Though they were members of three different congregations, and their ministries and personalities were significantly different, they were all in the prime of life (at least by the new baby boomer standards) when they died.

Update (February 2006)

There is a feeling of euphoria here today as we celebrate a day of full sun after 15 days of constant winter gloom, which was accompanied by lots of snow, ice and cold.  We in Minnesota cope much better with winter when we have our usual clear, sunny (even if cold) days.  Even those of us who don’t suffer from seasonal affective disorder (the low-grade depression caused by limited sunlight) have a tendency to begin whining about the heaviness of spirit that results from a long string of cloudy days.

Racism (Jan. 2006, Vol. 15, No. 2)

Racism is systemic and permeates virtually every US institution – judicial, political, social, medical/healthcare, education, labor, small and large businesses, the professions, sports teams, the arts, and the church.  Reflection on racism indicates a mixed message of progression and regression over the years...

Update (January 2006)

In a Benedictine monastery, at the end of the Liturgy of the Hours the prioress gives the community a blessing. I have no recall when the custom started in this monastery of bringing our calendars for the new year to Morning Praise on January 1. On New Year’s morning we include in that blessing a blessing of the calendars. It is an act that embodies our hope that we, as a community, want to be and desire to bring blessings to the days ahead. This hope is the link between our present and our future. It is a communal venture to move into the promise with renewed energy.

Update (December 2005)

I love the season of Advent. It begins with emptiness, expectation and waiting…a word spoken, a question and a response. It begins with a womb, the sacred capacity for life and the promise of fulfillment. It tells again the story of a journey. One woman shares the good news of a promise; another understands and shares the mystery.

Update (November 2005)

“…you have become obedient from the heart…” -- Romans 6: 18

As I read this phrase, I heard an invitation to listen deeply to myself so as to learn obedience from my heart. I realized that, after a series of major presentations, my inner well of creativity was pretty empty. And the question arose – What do I/we do when our well is empty? How can I/we be obedient to our call to leadership from the heart, even in times of emptiness

Update (October 2005)

These are apocalyptic times. First, the tsunami with more than 300,000 dead or missing visited our globe. Fishing villages disappeared and a people’s way of life changed forever. Our hearts were moved and the day after Christmas last year was not about gifts but about reaching out beyond our borders to victims. Why such destruction visited a poor people was the question that haunted our minds as we set out to donate to the relief effort. Today, the people who survived are frightened by the sounds of crashing waves, and terrified to return to their village and old way of life by the sea.

Update (August/September 2005)

This is the time of year for many transitions.  Many of you have or are completing your ministry of leadership and moving on to other endeavors!  Many are entering into this ministry and are experiencing the steep learning curve that comes with the job!  Whether you are serving for the first time or as a “recycled” leader, you are beginning a journey into an unknown future with your sisters and colleagues.

Update (July 2005)

It is wisdom to pause,
to look back and seeby what straight or twisting paths
we have arrived at the place
we find ourselves.

-- Mother Xavier Ross, Foundress of the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth

I write this, my last Update column, with gratitude, cognizant of the many blessings and opportunities I received these past three years.

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