LCWR

Leadership Conference of Women Religious

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Publications

LCWR offers its members a wide variety of publications designed to keep them informed of current information and events regarding the conference and religious life. These publications are available to the public as well.

For information on ordering LCWR publications, contact Carol Glidden at cglidden@lcwr.org.

Update (October 2004)

I recall fondly our time together in Fort Worth, remembering our communal expression in words, in song, and in the silence of our being, of our deepest longing for peace with justice.

Update (August/September 2004)

Ours is a world of change and challenge. We have audaciously claimed by the title of our joint assembly that “we are no longer bystanders.”  We can lament what is lost in our church and our world or we can be transformed by grace and become bearers of hope.  By our willingness to name the sins of our times, we make a commitment to bring the Gospel and our voices to speak to the present moment with all its promise and poverty.

Wal-Mart: Our Concerns and Response (Jun. 2004, Vol. 14, No. 3)

Wal-Mart operates more than 4,400 discount stores throughout the United States. The company reported sales of $256 billion and employed 1.4 million people in fiscal 2003. The mega-corporation is the largest employer in the world.  If it were an independent nation, it would be China’s eighth-largest trading partner. In its efforts to become the world’s largest retailer, the company has encounter many criticisms for its human rights violations, racial and gender discrimination, and its disregard for workers, among many other issues.

Update (June 2004)

Rome is still fresh in my mind.

It was a cool Roman April this year with a bit of rain several days.  Usually, the LCWR and the CMSM delegations visit in May.  However, anticipating the InterAmerican Conference in Brazil in May (postponed until 2005), we scheduled our trip in April.   So Mary Ann, Christine, Carole and I, along with the fi ve CMSM offi cers, ventured along the cobblestoned streets to the Vatican offi ces sometimes jointly, more often separately.  We shared prayer and liturgy, and enjoyed meals at small Roman trattatorias.  

Update (May 2004)

Easter “Alleluias” continue to fill the chapel in this time between Easter and Pentecost.  In the space of these days, the presence of the Risen Christ and his Spirit transformed the disciples.  Scripture gives us vivid images of the disciples moving from despair to hope, from sadness to joy, from fear to freedom, from doubt to belief.  This is a pristine moment for the Church to claim her identity as a communio of friendship of one mind and one heart.

Update (April 2004)

Invariably Easter draws me into the company of Mary Magdalen.  Like her, I am inclined to cling with a fierce tenderness to those I love dearly. And, like her, I know the liberating power of letting love spill out, without reserve, on a multitude of persons and situations.  Jesus said to her, “Do not hold on to me. . . but go to my sisters and brothers.  And Mary Magdalen went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord” (John 20: 17-18)

Striving for Fair Trade Opposition to Unjust Trade Agreements (Mar. 2004, Vol. 13, No. 2)

The FTAA is essentially an expansion of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) into Central America, South America and the Caribbean.  NAFTA, a trade agreement between Canada,Mexico and the United States, took effect in 1994 and has devastating effects on working families and the environment.  In the United States where many of our sisters serve in parishes, schools, hospitals, clinics,social services, etc. they have seen thousands of people lose their jobs because the factories have moved to Mexico or another country where labor is cheaper.

Update (March 2004)

As the month of March comes this year, I am mindful of March 2003 when President Bush issued his ultimatum to Iraq.  As I review these past months enmeshed in conflict, I question where we are a year later, personally, nationally, and internationally.  Prior to the declaration of war,LCWR, nationally and locally, used every means we could to advocate for no armed conflict.

Update (February 2004)

The political rhetoric is filling the air from the Primaries to the State of the Union speech.  So many promises yet our society has a sense of having been betrayed and trust is withheld.  Our faith is challenged by aworld filled with war and alienation, a world in which people are broken and enslaved by poverty and unjust structures.  For people who believe, it is a call to engagement and commitment to bring hope to a people and to our time. Life does not have to be arranged so that a few prosper and many suffer.

Reverencing the Earth (Jan. 2004, Vol. 13, No. 1)

“Sacred is the call, awesome indeed the entrustment. Tending the holy. Tending the holy.” How do we continue to move beyond these lyrics to a change in our patterns of action? The August 2003 LCWR national assembly grounded us in the reality of the sacred enterprise in which we exist not as dominators of creation but as participants in a cosmic story.  Does our participation reverence the earth or is it characterized by an addictive over-consumption, which depletes Earth’s non-renewable resources?

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