LCWR

Leadership Conference of Women Religious

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Publications

LCWR offers its members a wide variety of publications designed to keep them informed of current information and events regarding the conference and religious life. These publications are available to the public as well.

For information on ordering LCWR publications, contact Carol Glidden at cglidden@lcwr.org.

Earth’s Call: Reduce Our Footprint (Apr. 2009, Vol. 18, No. 2)

Elise Garcia, OP writes, “Like other informed people, I have been aware of global warming for some time. Seeing An Inconvenient Truth in 2006 raised my level of concern. But the matter moved to the backburner, again, as the unconscionable war in Iraq, the horrors of Darfur, and other pressing issues grabbed my attention. It wasn’t until 2007, a month after I made fi rst profession as an Adrian Dominican Sister, that I awakened to the magnitude of the problem.

Update (April 2009)

With a deep breath I begin this reflection. There have been so many agendas claiming attention these most recent days. Agendas within the Church and our world, within our congregations, within the lives of our sisters and those they serve… agendas within my own life as it is touched by all of these concerns.

Update (March 2009)

Through the liturgical year, we traverse the mystical reality of the Word Incarnate, the baptism of Jesus, and ordinary time. Slowly now – lento -- we move through the stories of the death of Jesus, a season for soul-reflection.

Update (February 2009)

Bold headlines, scrawled across the top of this morning’s newspaper, highlight a fragile economic climate around the globe. Many leaders of religious communities wonder how our assets can be stretched to care for members and to support ministry to those most affected by poverty. A new president promises to boost the economy by shoring up bridges and roads. If his strategy is effective, bridge-building may sustain many during this economic roller-coaster ride.      

Climate Change and Hunger (Jan. 2009, Vol. 18, No. 1)

For I was hungry…” Many speak of hunger. Who are the hungry? Around the world desperate cries of hunger resound. “With higher food prices now, we eat only once a day.” “We had hoped the rains would improve, but the animals died and food is scarce.” “Often it is leaves, shrubs, and mud cakes for the children.” 

Update (January 2009)

This month marks a major change for those of us who live here in the United States. We have the completion of the term of one President and the inauguration of another. For about two years we have been immersed in the prenomination, nomination, convention, and election process for this new national administration.

Update (December 2008)

The Sufi mystic and musician, Hazat Inayat Khan, wrote:

A person who, alone, has seen something beautiful, who has heard something harmonious, who has tasted something delicious, who has smelled something fragrant, may have enjoyed it, but not completely. The complete joy is in sharing one’s joy with others.

Update (November 2008)

While attending a meetingin Pennsylvania, I hadan opportunity to visitGettysburg, a site of a CivilWar that scarred our country and lefthundreds of thousands of soldiers dead,wounded, or missing. There on thebattlefield I grieved the loss of so manylives in a conflict that tore a union apart.Standing on the ground where AbrahamLincoln addressed a splintered nation,I glimpsed something of the impact ofa courageous president’s efforts to healdivisions, end the Civil War, free those enslaved, andredirect the attention of individual states toward thegood of the whole.

Clean Energy — A Tricky Business with Possibilities (Oct. 2008, Vol. 17, No. 3)

Is your response denial, despair or hope when you pay $4 a gallon for gas, see food costs continue to rise, and daily hear of the uncertain, fl uctuating economy? In the United States all are tied to increased energy needs that historically have been dependent on cheap, readily available fossil fuels.  Transportation uses 37% of our energy while production of electricity requires 40% more to sustain our lifestyle.  We are, in fact, only one-fi fth of the world’s human population but use 23% of the global energy diet (World Population Organization).

Update (October 2008)

Over the course of this summer many of us, as individuals or as congregations and organizations, have been through some major transitions. LCWR, too, has had major changes and this summer’s assembly process has set the stage for more.

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